Tag Archives: nutrition

Food as Medicine: A Prescription for Clearing Acne

5 Jun

We have become so focused on satiating the tastes buds with fast, salty, sweet, and processed foods that we have forgotten the purpose of food: Food is medicine for the body. This concept seems to have become lost in both modern medicine and in our culture.

Rind  of orange cutaway in spiral shape

It is not just that we have forgotten the purpose of food. Our minds have become conditioned and in some ways addicted to eating foods low in nutrients, but high in satiating the taste buds and giving us emotional comfort. Eating like this when you have acne or any disease impedes the body’s ability to heal because you choose low nutrient-filled foods.

Low nutrient-filled foods do not have what it takes for the body to heal acne. As a result, maintaining clear skin is a constant battle as you yo-yo from one remedy to another with perhaps temporary results, but with no lasting results. Poor nutrition can also acerbate and contribute to the cause of acne.

Coconut Milk Fruit ShakeBy the way, nutrient rich foods also satiate the taste buds and emotions. It is a matter of becoming aware of your diet and adapting your mind to a different way of eating. Once you do, you will wonder how you ever ate any other way.

When the body is diseased in some way (acne is a disease), it needs all the nutrients it can get to heal. The current western diet that most people eat is for the most part nutritiously poor. The other problem with our misdirected perception of food and its purpose comes from the medical establishment. Many dermatologists and other doctors say there is no connection between acne and diet. They are wrong…period.Spinach

Their heads are in the sand. Hello! Scurvy is from a lack of vitamin C; rickets is from a deficiency in vitamin D, and some cases of blindness are caused by vitamin A defieiciencyy. So, logic dictates that if these diseases are cured or prevented when the body is supplied with them then food is medicine for the body and will help with other diseases.

The food, however, has to be nutrient rich. Food is not created equal when it comes to nutrients. The long-held misconception is that if we are eating then we must be getting the nutrients we need. Wrong thinking.

If your diet consists of food from fast food chains, out of boxes, foods processed with chemicals, pizza, pasta, soda (including diet), sugary drinks and food, then you are not getting enough nutrients need to clear your skin of acne. You need whole foods in your diet; foods that are fresh.

DSC_0044For way too long, the role of nutrition in clearing skin has been sorely neglected or ignored. However, there is a growing number of enlightened doctors who are teaching their patients that food is medicine. Nutrient rich food helps to prevent disease and aids in the body in maintaining homeostasis. Food as medicine for acne is very important because the body not only needs nutrients to maintain its balance; it also needs them to heal the skin at the same time. The nutrients are doing double duty.

It really is impossible to have great looking skin without proper nutrition. Besides individual choices when choosing what to eat, there are contributing elements that are creating detrimental consequences to the nutritional health of the country. More on this in the next post. For now, if you have acne take a hard look at your diet.

Click to Buy Our Great All-Organic Skincare Line:

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Help with Wrinkles from Smoking & Recipe for Face Scrub

30 Apr

A customer from one of online retail sites where we sale our products asked us about what can be done about wrinkles from smoking.  We thought we’d share our answer here in case it can help others.  We also include a facial exfoliator recipe that can be made at home.

[C]an you help me with deep wrinkles from smoking?

You don’t mention your age or whether you have another skin condition, such as acne.  (I mention this because the question is listed under our acne serum.)  Both of these will determine the extent how much improvement you will see.   That said.  A two prong approach is needed.  First, you need to take steps that nourish and enhance the skin through diet and lifestyle.  Secondly, you need to prevent further damage to the skin.   And if you haven’t  given up smoking, that is where you need to begin.  Your skin has no chance of improving and will only get worse if you continue to smoke.

Wrinkles from smoking are a result of free radicals.  Smoking creates an inflammatory response in the body. Basically, among other things, smoking reduces the production of collagen and elastin.  Both are vital to smooth, healthy skin and as we age we naturally start to lose both; this can be accelerated by our lifestyle.

Antioxidants and anti-inflammatories are main keys to keeping the skin healthy and for reducing the effects of the environment and lifestyle on the skin.  Both our Argan Acne Serum and Argan & Allies Hydrating Serum contain anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory ingredients.

Regular exfoliation also helps to smooth out the appearance of wrinkles.  I exfoliate the skin on my face several times a week (actually almost daily) using our Coco-Mint Scrub.  (We are in the process of formulating a face wash for dry skin.)  The thing to remember is to use an exfoliator that is hydrating.  Below is a recipe for making a face scrub.

Do not use any products including cleansers that contain detergents– such as those that lather–because they will dry out your skin.  Dry skin enhances wrinkles.  You want to avoid any anything that dehydrates the skin.  In other words, you want to do all that you can to add moisture to the skin and prevent moisture loss.

Also, I always rinse my face with the coldest water possible to not only close the pores but to tighten the skin.   Keeping the skin moisturized and exfoliating regularly are what you can do on the surface.  However, we are firm believers that topicals alone cannot improve and keep skin healthy.  You need a whole-body approach that includes good nutrition, exercise, good skin care, and mental/emotional balance.  Healthy nutrition is most important.

Keep this in mind when choosing foods to eat: The skin is the last organ to receive nutrients.  So, your diet needs to be nutrient rich.  Eat fresh fruits and vegetables daily (if possible organic).  Dark green leafy vegetables have many skin loving nutrients.  Reduce or eliminate foods that are suggested to cause inflammation (meat, dairy, fast foods, fried foods, sweetened carbonated beverages, artificial sweeteners  etc.).  Vitamin C helps skin to rejuvenate; so it’s important to include foods with vitamin C.   Also, wear a hat that protects your entire face when in the sun.  The sun will only continue to damage the skin.

While we love sugar for use on the skin; internally it and caffeine contribute to wrinkles and dehydration.  Eliminating them helps to improve the texture and appearance of skin.  Drink plenty of water daily and avoid as many chemicals as possible.  Also, alcoholic beverages dehydrate the body, so avoid drinking them.

Exercise brings fresh oxygenated and nutrient rich blood to the skin.  Meditation is also helpful.  Yoga facial exercises help to strengthen the muscles underneath the face thereby reducing the appearance of wrinkles.  Check online; there are many sources for facial exercises.

Check out our blog: yumscrubblog.com.  We offer many suggestions in greater detail for healthy skin, including skin-loving recipes.

As you can see, it will take diligence and commitment to try and reverse the damage to some extent and prevent further damage.  Good luck.

If you have a question or comment about skincare, please email us we would love to help.

Love and Light, Yum Scrub Organics Team

Here’s the recipe to make your own face scrub to use… until we get ours launched 🙂

Yum Scrub Organics Orange-Lavender Face Scrub

1/2 cup organic sugar (if the sugar crystals are too large for your skin, you can grind them for 30 sec. or so in a blender).
1/2 cup organic plant oils (unrefined if possible) – almond, sunflower, safflower, avocado, olive are good choices
3 drops organic orange essential oil
3 drops organic lavender essential oil

Mix together.  Store in a jar.  Test on a small area of the face to make sure there isn’t a skin reaction to one of the ingredients.  Scoop some exfoliant into the palms, and massage over face and neck.  Rinse thoroughly with cool to cold water.  I usually allow my skin to dry naturally, which doesn’t take long here in Colo.  Apply hydration.

Disclaimer:
This information is for educational purposes only, it is not intended to treat, cure, prevent or, diagnose any disease or condition. Nor is it intended to prescribe in any way. This information is for educational purposes only and may not be complete, nor may its data be accurate.

Click to Buy Our Great All-Organic Skincare Line:

YumScrubhttp://bit.ly/1jKksLG

Abe’s Market bit.ly/1rueto2

Whole-Body Approach to Skincare

19 Mar

So, just what is a whole-body approach to skincare?  A whole-body approach is just that.  In order for the skin to be healthy and beautiful, or to heal a skin condition, it takes more that just topicals applied to the skin.  It involves all the aspects of your life.

In our collective psyche, skin has been viewed as something outside ourselves, meaning we often don’t see that our skin’s condition is as much dependent on our internal workings as any of the other body’s organs.

While skin is the largest organ in the body, I would venture to guess it is one of the least understood.  Much of how we view skincare is a trickle down effect from doctors.  They often approach skin disease and diseases in general through a myopic lens, focusing just on the disease.  Since the advent of the predominant pharmaceutical culture, physicians have stopped trying to heal the body or be healers.  For example, most dermatologist still harp that food, lifestyle, mental attitude do not have a part in acne.  Why is it so hard for them to connect the dots when diseases, such as scurvy that have skin manifestations are a result of improper nutrients?

On the other hand, a whole-body approach to acne says that the body is out of balance and needs to be brought back into balance with proper nutrition, exercise, stress reduction, etc.  It also involves the use of skincare products, but doesn’t just rely on them or pills as a cure. Dermatologists who do not counsel patients who have skin conditions about the effect of proper nutrition, exercising, mental attitude, stress, etc. on the skin are doing the patient a disservice.

The skin is an organ and is affected by our lifestyle just as any other organ is in the body.  Don’t get lolled into thinking that because we can see a layer of it on the outside that its not being affected by what you eat, think, do, and feel.

While Yum Scrub Organics produces skincare products, we know that products alone can’t do the job.  No matter the marketing hype from any cosmetic or pharmaceutical company, wrinkles, blemishes, eczema, psoriasis, backne, acne, dryness will not go away/stay away or diminish with just a skin-applied product.  Big spending advertising is another way we are lolled into thinking the skin is something separate from the rest of our body.  However, the right product can certainly play a large role in skincare (or we wouldn’t be in the business).

To really enhance the beauty or healing of your skin, you do need to also go deep inside.  A whole-body approach to skincare then is about all that makes you–you.  It involves what you eat and drink and what you don’t eat and drink; exercise, mental attitude/mindset, and spiritual development.  With regard to spiritual development, we are referring to the inner path or who you are as a person that comes from deep within–not the religious connotation of spirit.

Applying a whole-body approach, you embrace a natural healthy lifestyle that benefits your whole body.  You see the body as interconnected, what affects one part of the body affects another part and affects the whole body.  With this in mind you approach the care of your whole body–physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual–with mindfulness.  If you apply this approach, your skin will radiate and of course your entire body will be much healthier.

Click to Buy Our Great All-Organic Skincare Line:

YumScrubhttp://bit.ly/1jKksLG

Abe’s Market bit.ly/1rueto2

Browse through some of our posts to get some suggestions on some whole-body techniques.

Let’s Talk: Omega 3 for Great Skin

30 Jan

Back in the day–way back, kids would line up to get their daily spoonful of cod liver oil from mom.  The old cod liver oil was an acquired taste…not!  I don’t imagine anyone could ever come to relish its taste.  I can imagine that there were a lot of threats and promises to cajole kids into taking it.   However, families then knew the importance of omega 3 (cod liver oil is high in omega 3) in the diet, but somehow that’s been lost in more recent generations.  Even my mom remembered being made to have a spoonful of cod liver oil daily, but she never gave it to her children.  Although, we did eat a lot of fresh fish, nuts, and fresh greens (food sources of omega 3). 

Well, the word is out.  Americans are deficient in omega 3.  We aren’t eating foods that are high in omega 3, instead our diet is mainly meat, processed foods, and junk foods–all low in omega 3.   Omega 3 is one of two essential fatty acids that the body needs; the other is omega 6.  These two need to be in balance.  Because of the typical western diet, American diets are high in omega 6.  Omega 6 causes inflammation, and omega 3  fights inflammation.  So, for skin inflammations, such as acne, bacne, eczema, and psoriasis having omega 3 in the diet is imperative.  Omega 3 also helps with oil production; this benefits dry skin and acne (by keeping oils in balance).

Omega 3 – Just the Facts:

  •    Body does not make it on its own.   Needs to come from food.
  •   Most Americans are deficient in omega 3.
  •   Omega 3 and 6 need to be balanced.  Estimates are the typical American diet has 14- 25 times more omega 6 than omega 3.
  •   Omega 3 has two main fatty acids, DHA and EHA.
  •   EHA fatty acids helps the skin:
    boosts hydration – prevents and aids acne and eczema – slows aging process of skin – prevents collagen loss – repairs the skin – offers some protection against the sun and sun damage – regulates oil production – helps dry, itchy skin.
  • DHA aids in brain function.  It’s very important that pregnant women get omega 3 so their babies aren’t born omega 3 deficient. It can affect brain, eye, and nerve development.  More than half the fat in the brain is DHA.
  • Foods high in omega 3 fatty acids are:
    fish, especially salmon – salmon, flaxseed – chia, sunflower, and pumpkin seeds – walnuts – dark green leafy vegetables (a different kind of omega 3 is in nuts and vegetables)
    .
  •  Supplementation is another way to get omega 3.  Not all omega 3 supplements are equal; some contain little DHA or EHA.  Buy only those that have been independently tested.
  • Omega 3 is good for other conditions, such as eye conditions, depression, ADHD, heart disease, arthritis and other inflammations, cancer, autoimmune disorders, and stomach disorders.

BTW – Just like “a spoon full of sugar helps the medicine go down…in a most delightful way…,” cod liver oil now comes in orange and lemon flavors.  As far as  “delightful”…well….

Click to Buy Our Great All-Organic Skincare Line:

YumScrubhttp://bit.ly/1jKksLG

Abe’s Market bit.ly/1rueto2

Reference:

“Omega 3 Fatty Acids,” University of Maryland Medical Center.  Online: http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/omega-3-000316.htm

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